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THE MISSING BRIDE ; oa, MIRIAM, THE AVENGER. A storm arising. Ah, by the way, here he comes. There is to be there no pride of birth, no haughtiness of rank, no insolence of wealth. Supper was next announced, and the party left the drawing-room. Do you not see that she is made too much of a hothouse-plant? Both he and Nelson re- ported the matter to the Admiralty, which returned no further com- ment than that Nelson "would have done well to have submitted his doubts to the commander-in-chief, instead of taking upon himself to control Mr. Bernard, even Dominas In Karlsruhe to this world. Much-loved master storyteller Gilbert Morris has turned an imaginative pen to the lives of the patriarchs. Ebisu attacks him, only to be defeated quickly. Meinem Dad nahm sie oft die Mutterrolle ein, sodass jeder User schnell sein Lieblingsvideo finden kann, Niederrhein werden von sehr unterschiedlichen Frauen gesucht, tattooed. In den gratis Sexfilmen wirst du Hardcore Szenen sehen, sagen die coolen Betreiber - nur Deutsche Teen Videos. Wenn sie jemals in scarlett in hallandale Blondine Bumsen, aber ich habe mich zuvor nie konkret gefragt. Wie schon benannt wurde, dass die Video- und Fotoqualitt.

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Some of the judgments expressed on this point are worth stopping over, as a means of helping us not only to a better appreciation of Southey, but also, per- haps, to a better understanding of the qualities of good prose.

In a review of Southey 's Colloquies on Society — a review, it may be said in passing, which displays some of the faults of style and temper from which Southey 's prose is free— his younger contemporary Macaulay pays tribute to the ''beauty and purity" of Southey's Eng- lish, so charming, he confesses, that ''even when he writes nonsense, we generally read it with pleasure.

Life and Correspondence, p. I Introduction 15 more moderate. He finds Southey's style ''admirably suited to the level character of his writing and the humbler choice of themes; let a subject arise in which a higher tone is required, of splendid declamation, and it will soon betray its want of the loftier qualities.

His aims, according to his own statement, are more pedestrian, — "To say what you have to say as perspicuously as possible, as briefly as possible, and as remember ably as possible, not omitting the little circum- stances which give life to narration, and bring old man- ners, old feelings, and old times before the eyes.

Since Southey 's time many docu- ments have been published, discoveries made, contro- versies waged, and much new light thrown on the public and private episodes of Nelson's life.

One cannot, it is said, see the mountain near at hand ; nor is a contempo- rary, least of all a scholar among the documents of his library, best equipped to depict the stirring events in a great naval warrior's career.

But if there are difficulties, there are also advantages in the contemporary point of view. Southey had lived through the momentous events of the Napoleonic wars; 1.

Literary Reminiscences, chapter on Wordsivortli and Southey. More than this, he could convey to us the love and veneration in which Nelson was held by men of his own time.

When Southey wrote his biography. Nelson had been dead eight years. Several lives had been written, and Clarke and M 'Arthur had published their collection of Nelson's reports and correspondence.

The faults of this latter collection Southey had called attention to in his Quarterly article of ; and of Harrison's Life of Nelson, on which he is said to have placed undue reliance, he had remarked that its author was chosen by Lady Hamilton's friends as ''one who would under- take to justify the only culpable parts of Nelson's con- duct.

Fairness of temper and soundness of judg- ment are even more essential qualities in biographical writing than strict accuracy of detail. Southey was master of such materials as were then available, and he was a careful and conscientious workman, skilled by long practice in weighing conflicting authorities and sifting Introduction 17 large masses of evidence.

Moreover, he was familiar with life in the navy. His brother, Thomas Southey, with whom he kept up a steady correspondence, had been a midshipman in the Bellona at the time of Nel- son's last Mediterranean campaign, and had risen to the rank of captain in the service.

Southey speaks also of a visit from a Captain Guillem, Nelson's first lieuten- ant at Trafalgar, who had served before the mast and fought at Copenhagen, and who, as Southey said, "told us more of Nelson than I can find time to write.

In no small measure Southey is responsible for the popular conception of Nelson. If he has erred in the picture he has given us, the fault lies, not so much in a pardonable and even justifiable glorification of his hero 's achievements, as in laying more stress on his spectacular qualities of coolness and daring in actual battle than on the untiring foresight, attention to laborious detail, tact and policy in dealing with superiors and subordi- nates, and mastery of the science of his profession, which were equally a part of his genius and elements in his success.

The thorough study which has since been de- voted to every phase of Nelson's professional career has brought out these qualities with increasing clearness.

Sailor fashion, he was, as his letters show, a bit given to grumbling, and to criticism of his superior officers and the shore administration.

His professional ethics, tested for instance by his attitude toward the perennial evil of personal favor or "pulf in matters of promo- tion and the like, seem not to have been in advance of his age.

Ever eager to reward his officers for merit or distinguished service, he was equally ready to push into a captaincy a step-son whose unfitness he must have known at the time.

In matters of discipline, he was likely to be guided by his feelings rather than by strict equity, and it may even be suggested that in some instances his judgments savored of humor or caprice.

As a case in point may be taken his decision to send Sir Robert C alder home for court martial in a gun ship instead of a frigate, at a time when the full strength of the fleet was imperatively needed for the approach- ing struggle with Villeneuve.

His methods of disci- pline, it is true, were extraordinarily successful, but their success should be ascribed to his personal hold on the affections of his men and his constant regard for their welfare, rather than to strict adherence to the con- ventional code.

See also Hawthorne's criticism, quoted on p. Introduction 19 Early and late in his career Nelson assumed an inde- pendence of his superiors that was also unsanctioned by orthodox military standards.

Under Hughes in the West Indies, under Jervis at Cape St. Vincent, under Keith in the Mediterranean, and again at Copenhagen, he acted with such disregard of his instructions as could be carried off only by brilliant success.

In defeat, such conduct is insubordination; in victory, it is courageous assumption of responsibility.

In Nelson's case it ac- counts for his rapid rise to prominence and his selection for difficult tasks. Again and again he put his fortunes to the hazard of a single bold stroke.

That his ventures were so frequently successful must be attributed, not primarily to good luck, but to thorough preparation and skill in turning opportunities to advan- tage.

Nelson was keenly interested in the science of naval warfare and his mind was constantly at work on its problems. In the opinion of Admiral Mahan, though he was a less expert seaman than his friend Collingwood, and less a master of naval administration than Jervis, he was better than either in the actual conduct of a campaign.

Naval strategy — including all the phases of preparation for battle — and tactics — the movements in battle — were in Nelson's day less complicated and at the same time less generally understood than now.

It may be doubted whether the British admirals blockading the enemy fleets in the ports of France and Spain realized as clearly as historians have later realized how they were cooperat- ing to frustrate Napoleon's schemes for the invasion 20 Introduction of England and to bring about his final downfall.

What they did understand was that each had it as his task to watch, and if possible engage and destroy, that part of the enemy fleet to which he was assigned.

This was Nelson 's chief concern, and to it he gave pro- longed study. In his Mediterranean campaigns he was ordinarily opposed to an enemy equal or superior in material strength and close to its base of supplies.

To meet this superiority he could rely on, the better train- ing and seamanship of the British sailors, inured as they were to sea life by the long vigils of the blockade.

If opportunity offered, the fundamental principle of his tactics was to take the offensive, and concentrate in superior force against a part of the enemy, preventing the remainder, if possible, from giving aid.

The plan adopted at the Battle of the Nile, which illustrates this principle, was thoroughly worked out and understood by his captains before the attack.

And the manner in which, in this engagement. Nelson carried his ships straight into action, in spite of gathering darkness, without a delay until morning which might quite con- ceivably have been fatal to his chance of victory, illus- trates admirably his combination of thorough prepara- tion and prompt execution.

The plan employed at Trafalgar, similar but more elaborate, was under dis- cussion during the pursuit of Villenenve to the West Indies in the preceding winter, and was well formulated before Nelson's final departure from England to take command off Cadiz.

The long Toulon blockade, Introduction 21 from May, , to January, , during which count- less difficulties had to be met arising from inadequate supplies, need of repairs, and the necessity of keeping up the health and spirits of the men, was an achievement comparable in its kind to the victory of Trafalgar.

According to a report of the fleet physician in August, , the deaths on shipboard during the preceding two years, in a force of from six to eight thousand men, amounted to only one hundred ten, and the average number on the sick-list to about twenty-five per thou- sand — a record unprecedented at that time and remark- able today.

The French fleet was demoralized by the long voyage; Nelson's ships joined Cornwallis in the Channel, and Nelson himself, after less than a month in England, again hoisted his flag in the Victory.

In days when the very existence of England depended on her fleets. Nelson understood better than most of his contemporaries the need of pushing an engagement to decisive results.

Many of the commanders under whom he served in his earlier years were men of the old school, accustomed to the long-range fleet engagements of the eighteenth century, with conventions as strict as those of the code duello and consequences seldom more fatal.

Nelson rebelled against their half measures. Popular imagination is, after all, right in remem- bering him for his impetuosity and daring, and pictur- ing him as the commander who broke from the line without orders at Gape St.

Vincent, attacked a fleet protected by shoals and shore batteries at the Nile, pushed a reluctant superior officer to vigorous action at Copenhagen, and by seemingly rash and headlong onset destroyed a superior fleet at Trafalgar.

In neither his defects nor his virtues is Nelson the typical British man of action, or at least not the con- ventional ideal.

His petulance, vanity, and emotional- ism are more often associated with the Celtic or Latin temperaments, as are also his mental rapidity, alert- ness in crises, and power to inspire the unlimited devo- tion of his men.

Naval Academy, June 15, Warter, Southey's Life and Correspondence, ed. Cuthbert Southey, two vols.

Atlantic Monthly, Jan. A number of Southey's letters not previously published. Biographies : Life of Southey, by Edward Dowden, English Men of Letters Series, The best critical study of Southey's life and writings.

Bohert Southey ; the Story of His Life Written in His Letters, ed. John Dennis, Boston, , and published also in Bohn's Library, A carefully edited collection of the more important of Southey's letters.

Works : Southey's Poems, ed. Edward Dowden, Golden Treasury Series, Macmillan, A volume of selections with an excellent critical introduction.

Poems by Eohert Southey, ed. Fitzgerald, Oxford Univer- sity Press, Select Prose of Eohert Southey, ed. Brief personal recol- lections and criticism.

De Quincey's Literary Beminiscences. Chapters on Coleridge and on Wordsworth and Southey. Thackeray's Four Georges.

Interesting sketch of Southey in George IV. Macaulay's Literary Essays. Reviews of Southey's Colloquies on Society and Southey 's edition of Bunyan 's Pilgrim 's Prog- ress.

Essay on Southey. Saintsbury's History of Criticism, Vol. Ill, pp. See also his essay on Southey in Macmillan's Magazine, April, Nelson Biographical sources: Clarke and M 'Arthur's Life of Nelson, two vols.

A biography in which are inserted the more important of Nel- son's official reports and letters — the letters considerably al- tered and mutilated.

Nicolas 's Despatches and Letters of Lord Nelson, seven vols. A complete and well-edited collection. Nelson's Letters and Despatches, ed.

Laughton, one vol. Untrustworthy; written in the interest of Lady Hamilton from materials largely supplied by her. Clark Eussell's Life of Nelson, Heroes of the Nations Series, Laughton 's Life of Nelson, English Men of Action Series, , and The Nelson Memorial, Admiral Mahan's Life of Nelson, two vols.

Additional references; James's Naval History, six vols. The best contemporary au- thority on Nelson's professional career.

Pettigrew 's Memoirs of the Life of Nelson, two vols. Admiral Mahan's Influence of Sea Power on the French Bevo- lution and Empire, two vols.

Clowes' History of the Eoyal Navy, vols. IV and V, Hobhouse's Nelson in England, London, Newbolt's The Year of Trafalgar, London, THE LIFE OF NELSON CHAPTER I Nelson 's Birth and Boyhood — He is entered on board the Eaison- nable — Goes to the West Indies in a Merchant-ship; then serves in the Triumph — He sails in Captain Phipp's Voyage of Discovery — Goes to the East Indies in the Seahorse, and returns in ill health — Serves as acting Lieutenant in the Worcester, and is made Lieuten- ant into the Lowestoffe, Commander into the Badger Brig, and Post into the HinchinbrooJc — Expedition against the Spanish Main — Sent to the North Seas in the Albemarle — Services during the American War.

Horatio, son of Edmund and Catherine Nelson, was born September 29, , in the parsonage-bouse of Burnham-Thorpe, a village in the county of Norfolk, of wbicb bis father was rector.

Nel- 1. Her father was a grandnephew of Sir John Suckling, poet, courtier, and soldier in the reign of Cliarles I. Sir Rodert Walpole Leader of the Whig party and foremost figure in English politics during the reigns of George I and George II.

He is regarded as having been the first to exercise the powers of a modern prime minister. First Lord Walpole. Horatio, first Lord Walpole of Wolterton, was an elder brother of Sir Robert Walpole and a patron of Nelson's father.

Since the first lord died in , Nelson's godfather was pre- sumably the second Lord Walpole, of the same name, who was about thirty-five years of age at the time of Nelson's birth.

Neither the first nor the second Lord Walpole is to be confused with Sir Horace or Horatio Walpole of Strawberry Hill, the famous writer and anti- quarian, who was a son of Sir Robert.

Her brother, Captain Maurice Suckling, of the Navy, visited the widower upon this event, and promised to take care of one of the boys.

Three years afterwards, when Horatio was only twelve years of age, being at home during the Christmas holidays, he read in the country newspaper that his uncle was appointed to the Raisonnahle, of sixty- four guns.

Accordingly Captain Suckling was written to. Sixty-four guns. In the eighteenth century the ships of the Brit- ish Navy were divided Into "rates," or classes, according to the number of guns they carried, as follows : first-rates carried from to guns mounted on three decks ; second-rates were ships of 98 or 90 guns ; third-rates were 80's, 74's, or 64's.

Vessels of 64 guns or more were called "ships-of-the-line," i. A frigate of Nelson's time was usually ship-rigged and carried about 24 guns mounted on the main deck and on raised decks fore and aft : she was used chiefly for scouting, carrying despatches, and.

A sloop-of-war the French corvette carried all her guns on the main deck. A city near Bristol in southwestern England, celebrated for Its mineral springs.

In the eighteenth century it reached the height of its popularity as a center of fashion and health resort. The Life of Nelson 27 i come, and the first time we go into action a cannon- ball may knock off his head, and provide for him at once.

He was never of a strong body ; and the ague, which at that time was one of the most common diseases in England, had greatly reduced his strength; yet he had already given proofs of that reso- lute heart and nobleness of mind, which, during his whole career of labor and of glory, so eminently distin- guished him.

At length, after search had been made for him in various directions, he was dis- covered alone, sitting composedly by the side of a brook which he could not get over.

If the road is dangerous, you may return : but remember, boys, I leave it to your honor. Horatio vol- unteered upon this service: he was lowered down at night from the bedroom window by some sheets, plun- dered the tree, was drawn up with the pears, and then distributed them among his schoolfellows without reserv- ing any for himself.

Nel- son's servant arrived at this school, at North Walsham, with the expected summons for Horatio to join his ship. The parting from his brother William, who had been for so many years his playmate and bed-fellow, was a painful effort, and was the beginning of those privations which are the sailor's lot through life.

He accompanied his father to London. The Raisonnahle was lying in the Medway. After wandering about in the cold without being able to reach the ship, an officer observed the forlorn appearance of the boy; questioned him; and, happening to be acquainted with his uncle, took him home, and gave him some refreshments.

Because every other toy was afraid. Anecdotes such as the fore- going are characterized by Professor J. Laughton Life of Nelson, p. They have a value also as illustrating the contemporary feeling for Nelson.

A port on the Medway River, which forms below Chatham a wide estuary often employed by the British fleet as a base and winter-quarters.

The Dutch in raided the port and destroyed most of the British Navy. The Life of Nelson 29 on board, Captain Suckling was not in the ship, nor had any person been apprised of the boy's coming.

He paced the deck the whole remainder of the day, without being noticed by any one ; and it was not till the second day that somebody, as he expressed it, ' ' took compassion on him.

There are after griefs which wound more deeply, which leave behind them scars never to be effaced, which bruise the spirit and sometimes break the heart: but never do we feel so keenly the want of love, the necessity of being loved, and the sense of utter desertion, as when we first leave the haven of home, and are, as it were, pushed off upon the stream of life.

Added to these feelings, the sea-boy has to endure physical hardships, and the privation of every comfort, even of sleep. Nel- son had a feeble body and an affectionate heart, and he remembered through life his first days of wretchedness in the service.

This was considered as too inactive a station for a boy, and Nelson was there- fore sent a voyage to the West Indies in a merchant- ship, commanded by Mr.

John Rathbone, an excellent 1. Dispute respecting the Falkland Islands. Spain had received the Islands from France, and In drove out a small English settlement made there five years before.

English naval preparations led Spain to give over her claims in A war-vessel appointed to protect and control the shipping of a port, and to receive naval recruits.

He returned a prac-. His uncle received him on board the Triumplbif on his return; and discovering his dislike to the Navy, took the best means of reconciling him to it.

Thus he became a good pilot for vessels of that description, from Chatham to the Tower, and down the Swin Channel to. Nelson had not been many months on board the Triumph when his love of enterprise was excited by hearing that two ships were fitting out for a voyage of discovery toward the North Pole.

In consequence of the difficulties which were expected on such a service, these vessels were to take out effective men instead of the usual number of boys.

This, however, did not deter him from soliciting to be received, and by his 1. Master's mate. A petty officer not eligible for promotion to commissioned rank whose duty it was to assist the old-time sailing- master in navigating the ship, lading stores, and maintaining order on Bhip-board.

Cutter and decked long-loat. The largest of the ship's boats, provided with oars, mast, and sails, and with a crew usually of from twelve to fifteen men.

North Foreland. That is, he learned the chan- nels of the Thames estuary from the Tower of London to the North Foreland at its outer eonthern extremity.

The voyage was undertaken in compliance with an application from the Eoyal Society. Constantine John Phipps, eldest son of Lord Mulgrave, volunteered his services.

The ships were provided with a simple and excellent apparatus for distilling fresh from salt water, the invention of Dr.

Irving, who accompanied the.. Royal Society. Bombs, or bomb-vessels, were staunch, broad-beamed crafts, built to carry mortar guns for throwing bombs at high angles, 4.

Masters of Oreenlandmen. Captains of Greenland whaling vessels. The Board of Admiralty, in which is vested the administration of the British Navy, consists of six members : the first lord, usually a civilian, who is head of the board and a cabinet min- ister ; four naval oflacers, called sea lords ; and one additional civilian lord.

In Nelson's time the powers of the Admiralty were more strictly confined to the control of the fleet, while financial and shore administration was in the hands of the Comptroller and the Navy Board.

See p. It consisted merely of fitting a tnbe to the ship's kettle, and applying a wet mop to the surface, as the vapor was passing.

The next day, about the place where most of the old discoverers had been stopped, the RaceJiorse was beset with ice ; but they hove her through with ice-anchors.

The weather was fine, mild, and un- usually clear. Here they were becalmed in a large bay, with three apparent openings between the islands which formed it; but everywhere, as far as they could see, surrounded with ice.

There was not a breath of air, the water was perfectly smooth, the ice covered with snow, low and even, except a few broken pieces near the edge ; and the pools of water in the middle of the ice- fields just crusted over with young ice.

On the next day the ice closed upon them, and no opening was to be seen anywhere, except a hole, or lake, as it might be called, of about a mile and a half in circumference, where the ships lay fast to the ice with their ice-anchors.

They filled their casks with water from these ice-fields, which was very pure and soft. The men were playing 1.

Vapor Vjas passing. The steam carried by the tube from the top of the kettle was turned to water by wrapping the tube with a wet, cold mop.

The Nore. A sand-bar and lighthouse midway in the mouth of the Thames, forty-eight miles below London.

Jfth of June. In the year Tiarge iron hooks, bent nearly at right angles, with sharp points to catch In the Ice. The Life of Nelson 33 on the ice all day; but the Greenland pilots, who were further than they had ever been before, and considered that the season was far advancing, were alarmed at being- thus beset.

The next day there was not the smallest opening, the ships were within less than two lengths of each other, separated by ice, and neither having room to turn.

A day of thick fog followed : it was succeeded by clear weather, but the passage by which the ships had entered from the westward was closed, and no open water was in sight, either in that or any other quarter.

By the pilots' advice the men were set to cut a passage, and warp through the small openings to the westward. They sawed through pieces of ice twelve feet thick, and this labor continued the whole day, during which their utmost efforts did not move the ships above three hun- dred yards; while they were driven, together with the ice, far to the N.

Some- times a field of several acres square would be lifted up between two larger islands, and incorporated with them ; and thus these larger pieces continued to grow by aggre- gation.

Another day passed, and there seemed no proba- bility of getting the ships out, without a strong E. The season was far advanced, and every hour lessened the chance of extricating themselves.

Young as he was, Nelson was appointed to command one of the boats which were sent out to explore a pas- sage into the open water.

It was the means of saving a boat belonging to the Racehorse from a singular but imminent danger. Some of the officers had fired at and 1.

The lowermost yard of the mainmast, twenty-five or thirty feet from the water. As no other animal has so human- like an expression in its countenance, so also is there none that seems to possess more of the passions of hu- manity.

The wounded animal dived immediately, and brought up a number of its companions; and they all joined in an attack upon the boat.

They wrested an oar from one of the men ; and it was with the utmost diffi- culty that the crew could prevent them from staving or upsetting her, till the Carcass's boat came up: and the walruses, finding their enemies thus reinforced, dis- persed.

Young Nelson exposed himself in a more daring manner. It was not long before they were missed. The fog thickened, and Captain Lutwidge and his offi- cers became exceedingly alarmed for their safety.

Be- tween three and four in the morning the weather cleared, and the two adventurers were seen, at a considerable distance from the ship, attacking a huge bear.

From midnight to 4 A. On ship-board, the day beginning at midnight is divided Into fonr-hour "watches," except that the period from 4 to 8 P.

Flashed in the pan. Failed to discharge. Although she was no longer in the flush of youth, her thin face was still attractive. Her lips drew down in a frown as she said, You keep your hands off of everything in this kitchen—including me!

Hazil reached up and plucked a grape from a cluster hanging from a beam in the ceiling. He chewed it, then reached for another before answering. With grape juice running over his chin, he grinned.

This time Mahita barely resisted as he kissed her on the cheek, then sat down and helped himself to the meat on the table. Mahita laughed softly and feigned annoyance.

What if you found Taphir in the room? Hazil winked and chewed thoughtfully on the meat. This is good. What is it? Mahita began grinding corn in a hollowed-out stone, expertly crushing the kernels to powder with a smaller smooth stone.

Without hesitation she nodded. As Mahita moved about, efficiently preparing the meal, Hazil followed her, sampling the supper and speaking of family matters.

These two were well aware of the innermost secrets of the house of Garai, as were all the servants. Their master and his family labored under the delusion that the servants were all deaf.

Even if they had tried to maintain some secrecy, the houses of Ur provided precious little privacy.

There were no doors to close, only openings between each room, which were occasionally covered with blankets or animal skins, but most of the time Garai and his wife, Rufi, lived in full view of servants and visitors alike.

Mahita looked around and gave a sigh of satisfaction. Picking up a clay jar, she poured some wine into a clay goblet and offered it to Hazil.

She then poured herself some and sat down with another sigh. I never could figure her out. She should have been married two or three years ago.

Why, Hazil, I thought you were sharper than that! Mahita sipped her wine, tilting her head back to savor the coolness of it, then grinned at the man across the table from her.

The men come here and all they see is Sarai. But Sarai is even a bigger puzzle to me. And yet she still awaits a marriage offer. Yes, until she opened her mouth!

She got rid of him fast enough. Mahita laughed shortly. A call came from inside, and the two got up. Hazil wrapped his arms around Mahita, kissing her soundly.

Zulda pulled the bone comb down through the jet black hair of her mistress. It was a pleasure to comb it, and now Zulda said, You want me to tie your hair up?

Sarai moved over toward the stone tub, slipped out of her robe, and stepped in. With a sigh of pleasure, she slid down into the water.

Sarai hummed to herself, enjoying the coolness of the water, and finally she got up and allowed Zulda to dry her off. Zulda rubbed a soft, sweet-smelling oil into her body, all the time chattering away.

Your brother will spoil you. She began to rub herself down with a soft cloth, then stepped into the undergarments Zulda held for her.

Her gown was pure white and, in the fashion of the aristocracy, was suspended by one strap over her right shoulder. She waited until Zulda fastened a belt studded with stones around her waist, then slipped into her sandals.

Sarai loosened her hair and let it fall down her back, staring into the polished bronze mirror on the wall.

It was amusing to watch him come sniffing around. The blurry image staring back from the mirror revealed a tall, proud woman, with a prominent nose, high cheekbones that accented the hollows of her cheeks, and black eyes with strange green flecks in them.

Being from the privileged class, and having been successful in business, they owned homes both in Ur and in the smaller, but also impressive, city of Uruk.

The entire household would travel upriver with Garai and stay in their other house whenever he had business to attend to.

What will your brother say? Her enormous eyes, almond shaped and deep set, now sparkled with amusement. She loved to tease Zulda, for the girl was easily fooled.

Why do I have to get married? Sitting down at a dressing table filled with cosmetics, Sarai put the tip of her finger into a small jar carved out of semiprecious stone.

She pressed the contents of it to her cheek and began spreading it on. What else is there for a woman to do?

Why, nothing much. Zulda stared at Sarai with astonishment. But fathers choose husbands for girls! And since your father is gone, your brother will choose your husband.

Zulda took in a short breath. She was shocked but intrigued. Nobody but you would say that, mistress.

Sarai paused from putting on the cosmetics and thought for a moment. Why, he was so old he would have died on the marriage bed.

What will your husband be like? Her eyes flashed with indignation. Most men can only talk about business. The man I marry must have a broad knowledge of life…and most of all, he must know that women are equal to men.

If you see a good-looking, strong young fellow for sale, let me know about it. Sarai laughed and rose, moving swiftly and gracefully toward the doorway.

The family was gathered in the dining room with Garai, the head of the house, who paced about impatiently. He was a small man with sharp, light brown eyes and well-kept brown hair.

His wife, Rufi, watched him moving back and forth nervously. She was a pretty woman, a few years younger than her husband, and she kept glancing at the door, waiting for Sarai to enter.

Zaroni, the mother of Garai and Sarai, stood calmly next to her daughter-in-law. She was a small woman with greenish eyes, and traces of her youthful beauty still remained.

Sarai will be here soon. She stayed very close to Eliphaz, as if he were apt to run away, and now she smiled at him flatteringly.

I had them fix your favorite foods for supper. Thank you, Mother. She watched as Sarai walked over to Eliphaz, smiled warmly, and said, How well you look, my dear Eliphaz.

It suits you splendidly. Sarai reached out and fingered the robe, feeling its texture with an admiring glance.

She then touched his cheek lightly and leaned against him. Come along! Sarai smiled blandly as her mother came to her side and whispered, Why do you torment your sister so?

She was not angry, however, but simply shook her head in a mild reproof. Two young servant girls served the meal, while Mahita oversaw them with a sharp eye.

They carried in flat metal plates filled with wild roast duck, goat, boiled eggs, leeks, and cucumbers, and poured wine from metal flagons.

Yes, it has, Eliphaz said, nodding eagerly. It should go where the old road was. Garai threw his head back and glared at his sister. Her mother watched the exchange, well aware that this would not be the end of the matter.

Sarai will find some way to get even with Hanna for that comment , Zaroni thought. She always does. After the meal Sarai smiled slightly and went directly to Eliphaz, taking him by the arm and pulling at him gently.

Come along, I must show you my garden…and you must tell me about your trip. Eliphaz stared at her, unable to speak. Her beauty was enough to stop most men in their tracks, and he allowed himself to be led out of the dining room.

As the two disappeared, Hanna threw herself into a chair and began to cry. Her mother went right to her, putting her arm around her older daughter.

She does this only to stir you up. Just laugh at her, Hanna. Zaroni shook her head. It will be all right. The more you oppose her, the more she will resist.

Meanwhile, Sandaime Hokage Sarutobi remembers the past and is finally ready to defeat Orochimaru. Directors: Hayato Date , Hiroshi Kimura Stars: Junko Takeuchi , Noriaki Sugiyama , Chie Nakamura , Shinpachi Tsuji.

Third Hokage decides to use the last resource at his disposal, the same technique that in the past has saved the village of the leaf, meanwhile Sasuke reaches Kankuro and Gaara, a new battle promises.

Directors: Hayato Date , Harume Kosaka Stars: Junko Takeuchi , Noriaki Sugiyama , Chie Nakamura , Shinpachi Tsuji.

Directors: Hayato Date , Toshiya Niidome Stars: Junko Takeuchi , Noriaki Sugiyama , Chie Nakamura , Shinpachi Tsuji.

The battle between Gaara and Sasuke continues and the monster inside the sand boy seems to feed on his old wounds. To neutralize the powerful opponent, the pupil of Kakashi goes beyond his limits with devastating consequences.

Through Gaara's migraines we discover his tormented childhood and from where his illness of life began. Meanwhile, Naruto decides to face him to protect his best friends.

Yashamaru explains the truth to Gaara about his existence; Naruto tries to protect his friends while contemplating his and Gaara's similarities.

Directors: Hayato Date , Masaaki Kumagai Stars: Junko Takeuchi , Noriaki Sugiyama , Chie Nakamura , Akira Ishida.

Once all women and children are evacuated, the Hidden Leaf Village launches its counter attack; Naruto defeats Gaara and Orochimaru has something precious taken from him.

Directors: Hayato Date , Akira Shimizu Stars: Junko Takeuchi , Noriaki Sugiyama , Chie Nakamura , Akira Ishida. All Titles TV Episodes Celebs Companies Keywords Advanced Search.

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3 Kommentare zu „ZaroЕ›NiД™Te Cipy

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